Jerusalem Evening on Jewish Psychology–“Bereavement and Loss: Between Separation and Continuity”

18 06 2009

First of all, an apology for not having written since April. I have not given up on this project. The truth is, my financial situation changed somewhat back in March, so I’ve been spending the time that I used to spend on this applying for jobs and to programs for next year. I have more substantial posts lurking in the recesses of my brain, though, and hope to find time to write them up before too much time passes. Thank you for staying with me.

In the meantime, another note about an upcoming event related to this blog. See below!


ErevIyun_JewishPsychology_2009_06_24e-mail

 

There is what looks like a fascinating evening on “Jewish psychology” at the Begin Center, cosponsored by Beit Morasha of Jerusalem and The Rotenberg Center for Jewish Psychology. I am especially interested in the film portion of the evening, and in the panelists speaking about loss and bereavement from an educational perspective and from a midrashic perspective.

I am not 100% sure about this whole “Jewish psychology” thing. I know that it is a field created by Professor Mordechai Rotenberg. A little bit is written about it here. I recently bought two books about Jewish psychology, both published in Israel and written in Hebrew, and have been working my way through one of them (very slowly). “Jewish psychology,” as a field, might be ridiculous or, even worse, dangerous. I am deeply curious, though. I know that it is based on ideas from midrash, kabbalah, and hassidut, and I am generally of the belief that classic Jewish texts have psychological and emotional truths to teach us (and we, them). I am wary, though, of attempts to reject Western psychological ideas, since I think that those ideas have done me, and many others, a lot of good. (I am less wary of attempts to correct, or modify, those ideas.) So, in sum: curious and suspicious.

In any case, this evening event takes place next Wednesday, June 24, from 7-10 pm. The general topic of the evening is “Bereavement and Loss: Between Separation and Continuity.” It costs 30 shekels and will be entirely in Hebrew.

Please pass this information along to anyone else you know who might be interested. Thanks!

The translation of the e-mail announcement (above) is:


Bereavement and Loss: Between Separation and Continuity

and
invite the public to
the annual evening of study of Jewish psychology
in memory of Boaz Rotenberg.
It will take place on Wednesday
2 Tammuz 5769
24 June 2009
at 7 pm

The translation of the poster, below, reads:

Annual evening of study of Jewish psychology
in memory of Boaz Rotenberg

Bereavement and Loss: Between Separation and Continuity
Wednesday
2 Tammuz, 5769
24 June 2009

7 pm
Opening Remarks
Mr. Meir Fechler (sp?), Executive Director of the Center for Jewish Psychology
Introduction to the Topic of bereavement and loss in Jewish psychology
Mrs. Michal Fechler (sp?), clinical psychologist

7:20 pm
Part A
8:00 pm
Part B
Panel: Coping with Actual Bereavement [I am not 100% sure that רב-שיח means “panel”–please let me know what it means if I’m wrong]
Moderator: Prof. Mordechai Rotenberg
  • Clinical Perspective
    Dr. Baruch Kahana, Lecturer in School for Social Work and in Clinical Psychology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Mrs. Rut Gombo (sp?), clinical psychologist
  • Educational Perspective
    Rabbi Ronen Ben-David, Principal of Neveh Chana Boarding School
  • Midrashic Perspective
    Dr. Ido Hevroni, researcher in Rabbinic literature
9:45 pm
Concluding Remarks

Entry Fee:
30 NIS
Parking next to Independence Bell Park (“Gan HaPa’amon”) or opposite the Har Zion Hotel
(between Independence Bell Park and the Cinemateque)
ErevIyun_JewishPsychology_2009_06_24poster

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